Why Israelis Brag About Their Big Head (Rosh Godal)

LINK: Word of the day / Rosh gadol: What sort of head do you have?

In this article, Shoshana Kordova does a great job of explaining the Hebrew terms rosh gadol (“big head”) vs. rosh katan (“small head”). While telling someone that they have a big head may be career limiting in English speaking circles, telling them they are rosh gadol is paying them a high compliment. Rosh gadol describes the ability to see the big picture as opposed to focusing on the small tasks. Hit up the article for a helpful discussion of the difference in these two types of people and why organizations have (and need) both.

Years ago a great post on the Joel on Software blog discussed how developers would ideally be rosh gadol. In reality, your team will consist of both rosh gadol and rosh katan resources. As a project manager or technical lead, identifying which type of thinker each team member is can help you guide them towards tasks they’ll be more comfortable and efficient with. It might also help you manage your expectations when dealing with these two types of individuals.

Can “One Windows” Fix Microsoft’s App Problem?

History of Windows logosWhat Does One Windows Mean for You? – Don Jones on Pluralsight blog

The idea of one Windows is intriguing, but as Don points out, it can mean different things to different people. The elusive “one application to rule them all” approach to cross platform support has been around for decades without ever truly coming to fruition. My experiment with Microsoft Surface over the last year has taught me that the tablet apps and desktop apps are entirely different animals. Microsoft’s attempts to build one operating system that does both desktop and touch at the same time has produced an OS that does neither particularly well.

I hope that Microsoft is leaning from the dismal uptake of Surface (and other Windows tablets). It’s all about the user experience. While people say they want to run all their Windows apps on any device, if the experience becomes a frustrating series of impossible-to-click buttons and text editing nightmares, they’ll decide tablet computing just isn’t worth it. Don’s view is that much of Apple’s success with developers hasn’t been because of write once/run anywhere software. Instead, he suggests that Apple’s iOS and desktop application boom comes from allowing developers to reuse code to create separate applications that cater the strengths of each platform. I agree. Microsoft has to embrace the advantages of each its various computing platforms (phone, embedded, desktop, tablets and Xbox) while making it easy for developers to move and reuse code between all of them.